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PowerShell Core

PowerShell 5.1 is the latest release of the original PowerShell.  Starting with version 6.0, PowerShell is now referred to as PowerShell Core.  PowerShell Core 6.0 is cross-platform - supported on macOS, Linux, and Windows - and built on .NET Core instead of the traditional .NET framework.

Mitchell Grande by Mitchell Grande

Using Git: A Beginner’s Toolkit

This blog will introduce the basic commands when using Git Bash (git’s built in command window) as well as basic git concepts.

Trevor Suarez by Trevor Suarez

Conditionals and "For" in Terraform

Terraform allows us to deploy infrastructure as code using a high level configuration language known as HCL. Terraform is a good tool for building infrastructure for a wide range cloud providers, but it can be difficult to implement standard control flow statements- if statements and loops- that are present in standard programming languages. 

Leo Ling by Leo Ling

Polymorphic Associations Using EF Core

"Polymorphic Associations" is an interesting SQL anti-pattern that is utilized often in Ruby on Rails code. This pattern isn't natively supported in Entity Framework Core; however, Polymorphic Associations can be implemented using existing EF Core features.

Dalton Smith by Dalton Smith

Cumulative Sum by Period to Period Change in Power BI

A cumulative sum is a sequence of partial sums of a given sequence. I am going to construct a cumulative sum of sales graphic by period to period change in Power BI. This type of graph simultaneously helps readers understand the change in sales over the course of twelve months and a whole year.

Megan Dehn by Megan Dehn

Moving Big data in and around Azure using Azure Data Factory.

There are numerous data storage options available on Azure, each one designed and developed for different modern data storage scenarios. These storage options could be in the form of database, data warehouse, data caches and data lakes. Usage of these depends on the application and the scale that they serve. Within databases, some applications might need relational database, some might need NOSQL, or a key-value storage, or in-memory database (for caching), or blob storage (for media and large files). Another criteria to keep in mind when selecting a database for your application is the required read-write throughput and latency. Azure has a wide array of fully-managed database services which frees up the development teams valuable time in managing, scaling and configuring these databases.

Whatever database you choose, you should also keep in mind how easy or difficult it is to move the data in and out of that database. You might have a situation in future where you need to move to a new database solution because of reasons like change in application architecture, scale, performance, or even cost. Microsoft Azure has a very powerful ETL tool called Azure Data Factory to easily move data in and around Azure at scale. It has over 80 native connectors which can serve both as source and sink.  In this blog, I would like to highlight a few features and concepts of Azure Data Factory which will serve as a quick start guide for anyone looking to do data movement and transformation on Azure.

Siddharth Bhola by Siddharth Bhola